Tag Archives: Seed Capital

5 Reasons to Attend The USD V2 Pitch Competition For Entrepreneurs

5 Reasons to Attend The USD V2 Pitch Competition For Entrepreneurs

On Thursday April 28th University of San Diego School of Business will hold an exciting competition in a “Shark Tank” like setting.

Top student entrepreneurs from USD and Tijuana will compete for a total of $100,000 in cash and invaluable mentorship and support.

The Startup Garage Team Compiled The Top 5 Reasons this is a must attend event:

1. There’s is no cost to attend.
It’s a completely FREE event although space is limited.
*HINT sign up early to reserve your seat.* When was the last time you had the opportunity to spent time with like minded entrepreneurs in a beautiful setting at no cost?
Register here

2. Absorb expert advice and insights from keynote speaker Tim Suski.

Tim co-founded one of the fastest growing boutique fitness franchise in Southern California, (The Rush Cycle Franchise) and also launched a technology platform used by 500+ businesses across the globe.

3. Fuel your entrepreneur inspiration.
The students pitching include a unique blend of entrepreneurs, each with their own innovative story and journey to share.

USD Current Student Entrepreneurs includes:

Lacy
Lacy is a bra washing machine (patent pending) that carefully protects bras and
delicates from the damage they normally endure during traditional washing methods.

FoldedColor
Technology company FoldedColor is an e-commerce solution for custom printed
packaging, offering standard and customizable folding carton options through a web-
to-print interface that includes instant pricing, an intuitive design editor, virtual 3D
proofing and online checkout.

TechMeetsTrader
This free social community for stocks and options investors, TechMeetsTrader
makes it easy to capitalize on investment opportunities and to learn from
experienced traders.

Like Cats and Dogs
Like Cats and Dogs produces a safe pet toy for both cats and dogs.

Bi-National Track Entrepreneurs Include:

AGROSOL
AGROSOL offers a fertilization, fumigation and geographical scanning system
performed by drones.

Baja Saver
Baja Saver generates clean and cheap energy through a product as small as a home
refrigerator that is 100 percent self-sufficient, more effective than wind and solar
systems and a better return on investment.

Ñapanga
Ñapanga produces and distributes a microbrew with a female focus.

FXR
FXR is an app used to request certified professional services for home repair and
maintenance.

4. Learn the art of pitching a Startup first hand.
Feel the presenters emotion and techniques when listening to a pitch, and tune into the panelist (potential “investors”) asking hard hitting questions.

5. Anyone can benefit from attending the V2 Pitch Competition.
Networking is key. “Meeting the right people and making connections to the San Diego start-up community is key to the success of any venture. We are lucky to bring in a unique crowd to the V2 Pitch Competition filled with investors, Entrepreneurs, alumni, and community partners. V2 has become an evening to connect, celebrate, and support our thriving San Diego and CaliBaja start-up ecosystem.” Regina Bernal, Entrepreneurship and Experiential Learning USD

Now that you’ve decided to join us, be sure to say hello to The Startup Garage Team!

We’ll have a table set up from 5-6pm at the Venture Fair prior to the event to answer any burning Startup Questions

Crowdfunding For Equity: Title III and Equity Crowd Funding 101

Business Plans and Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding For Equity: Title III and Equity Crowd Funding 101

What is Equity Crowdfunding?

Equity crowdfunding is on the rise after the signing of the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act was signed by President Obama in April 2012.

Simply put, it is a type of crowdfunding that enables broad groups of investors to fund startup companies and small businesses in return for equity.

Three years after the JOBS Act was initially passed, Title IV (Regulation A+) went into effect, allowing larger companies to accept capital from both accredited investors (the wealthiest 2% of Americans) and non-accredited investors (the other 98% of Americans). This expanded when Title III (Regulation CF) was enacted in October 2015, which also allowed early stage companies to accept capital from both accredited and non-accredited investors.

More About Title III (Reg CF)

Title III allows startups and small businesses to raise up to $1M from the general public – an unprecedented way to raise capital. More specifically, investors who have less than $100,000 in both income and net worth may invest at least $2,000 per year, and as much as 5 percent of their income or net worth (whichever is less) per year.

Investors whose income or net worth is greater than $100,000 may invest up to 10 percent of their income or net worth (whichever is less) per year.

Thus, Title III gives companies that are historically underserved by the current capital markets an equal opportunity to equity financing.

On May 16th, Title III will officially go into effect.

Process

Choosing a Funding Portal

Under Title III, companies must use an online intermediary (either a broker-
dealer or crowdfunding portal registered with the SEC and FINRA), to facilitate a
fundraise. Experienced portals with a deep understanding of the regulations
surrounding Reg CF can help ensure that their campaigns are compliant with SEC rules.

Filing a Form C

Companies raising under Title III do not need to get SEC approval to initiate their
raise. They must, however, prepare a Form C and file it with the SEC 21 days prior to launching an offering. This form includes basic information about the company, its employees and the terms of the raise.

Disclosure Requirements – Financial Information

In addition to Form C, necessary financial information will depend on the size of
the intended investment needs:

 Under $100k – Internal financial statement review

 $100k-500k – CPA reviewed financial statements

 500k-1M – 3rd Party audited financial statements

 1st time crowdfunding issuers offering more than $500,000 would be permitted to provide reviewed, rather than audited, financial statements.

 Disclosure Requirements – Ongoing Reporting

Providing progress reports not only build trust with investors and keep them informed, but they’re also a very much required part of the disclosure requirements. Upon the successful closure of your campaign, you will be required to provide ongoing updates to your investors in the form of an annual report, which will include similar information that was included on the Form C.

In summary, what are the benefits and pitfalls of Title III?

Benefits:

 Title III can be an efficient way to quickly startups raise capital from the crowd

 More investors equate to more supporters in your startup

 Reporting requirements give founders and investors an opportunity to

Pitfalls:

 Current statutory disclosure obligations and costs are overly burdensome

 Legal and accounting fees may be higher than traditional capital-raising

 Title III does not include a “testing the waters” provision (like Reg A+ maintain a more open and transparent dialogue methods does) so that issuers can gauge interest before incurring burdensome filing and preparation costs

Remember, Regulation CF will become effective 180 days after the final rules are published in
the Federal Register on May 16, 2016.

If you have a question about your equity crowdfunding for your Startup or you’d like to discuss our business plan writing services, feel free to contact us for a free consultation!

Why To Take Caution With Investor “Finders”

Why To Take Caution With Investor “Finders”

There are many service providers that offer to help startups with attracting investors, colloquially referred to as “finders.”

While they prefer to be called business brokers or consultants, most finders are either CPAs, insurance brokers, retired executives, or former entrepreneurs. They mostly operate in the Angel landscape, targeting deals between $100K to $2M.

Typically, they will either require a large retainer, an upfront fee, a percentage of capital raised, or some combination of all three.

The service they provide ranges from screening investors and setup meetings to developing a list of high-net-worth prospects for entrepreneurs to call on.

Unfortunately, there is a lot of controversy when working with finders. First, a sizeable majority of finders are not actually licensed as a securities broker by FINRA and are therefore in violation of federal and state security laws, whether they know it or not. Second, many finders are not capable of delivering on their promises or simply disappear as soon as you hand them a retainer check.

How This Affects You:

The issue that Startups face when working with unlicensed finders is that their legal problems can quickly spread to the startup as well. Payments to an unlawful finders can cause an entire transaction to violate securities law, giving investors a right to undo the deal as well as sue the Startup for damages.

Even if an investor does not undo the deal, these unlawful transactions can come back to haunt the company if and when the company decides to sell or go public as it may be forced to disclose the violations, thereby jeopardizing the pending deal. On the other hand, working with less than honest finders will clearly be a waste of time and money.

Advice:

Retain a good corporate securities attorney before you engage with a finder. Your securities attorney should be able to:

A) help you understand the full scope of risk of using finders in financing transactions.

B) help you verify that your potential finder is licensed with FINRA and your local state’s regulators.

C) ensure that your finder does not have any substantial complaints against them.

If you have a question about raising capital for your Startup or you’d like to discuss our business plan writing services, feel free to contact us for a free consultation!

Furry Innovation: Pets Are Startup Businesses New Best Friends

Furry Innovation: Pets Are Startup Businesses New Best Friends

It’s no denying it, we love our pets and we’re willing to spend countless amounts of money in order to enhance their health, happiness, and even appearance.

According to the American Pet Products Association an estimated $58.5 billion was spent on pets in 2014. With nearly $330 million on pet costumes for Halloween alone.

From OnDemand Pet Adoptions to “Furspray” the newest way to decorate your pet for special occasions, Pet Startups combine the love of animals with a high-growth business opportunity. However, along with business opportunities comes fierce competition.

Currently listed on Angel List, there are 490 Pet Startups with an average valuation of $3.7 million across a pool 1,012 Investors. Leading the pack and setting the investment stage are DogVacay and Bark&Co.

DogVacay offers an on demand approach to petsitting near home, having securing 4 healthy funding infusions since 2012. Including: $1 million dollar seed round in May 2012, $6 million Series A round in Nov. 2012, $15 million dollar Series B round in Oct. 2013, and $25 million in Oct 2014.

Bark & Co. leveraged an untapped business model of a monthly subscription box of dog goodies with BarkBox and continued to expand across several other major properties:

BarkPost: Your daily dose of doggy news
BarkShop: Spoil your pup with the very best
BarkBuddy: Find fluffy adoptable singles in your area
BarkLive: Amazing experiences for you and your dog

Also securing a steady funding infusion including: $25,000 in Jan 2012, $1.7million in July 2012, $5million Series A round in April 2013, and $15million Series B Round in July 2014.

Funding is so red hot for Pets Startups, if the U.S. pet products industry collectively was a Fortune 500 company, it would be bigger than Google, Dell, UPS, or Coca-Cola.

Meanwhile, like any high-growth industry, it’s attracting a new breed of startup entrepreneurs with furry ambitions.

Here are a few “underdogs” that captured our attention here at The Startup Up Garage.

XcDogs: Based out of Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and it connects people who travel with their pets to locals willing to pet-sit short-term who is actively seeking funding at this time.

CleverPet: a local San Diego Startup which with a “Smart” pet gadget that educates and interacts with your animal companion in your absence. CleverPet had a successfully funded Kickstarter campaign of $180,623 and appears to have a variety of undisclosed funding in Sept 2015.

Urban Leash: offers on demand dog walking and cat-sitting services from anywhere at anytime, who a secured a $99,500 seed round in Nov 2014.

AllPaws is OkCupid for Finding Pets to Adopt, Swiping left and right and sifting through profiles is a regular practice for people looking for love nowadays.

Through the website and app AllPaws, the same approach is being used for those looking for a four-legged soulmate. AllPaws raised $1 million in capital in April 2013.

Will the Pet Startups above disrupt the pet industry as we know it?
Only time will tell, if they’re barking up the right tree.

If you have a question about your Startup business idea or you’d like to discuss our business plan writing services, feel free to contact us for a free consultation!

The Importance of Bookkeeping for a Startup Business

The Importance of Bookkeeping for a Startup Business

Bookkeeping, by definition, is the process of recording a company’s financial transactions and history.

It is the first step in the broader accounting process which involves reporting and analyzing data to make business decisions.

Many entrepreneurs find that they are wearing too many hats as it is and they just
don’t have time to dedicate towards proper bookkeeping.

However, bookkeeping is crucial for any startup for several reasons:
First and foremost, it helps companies make better financial and management decisions. Proper bookkeeping can help you understanding the key financial benchmarks that determine whether your company is operating successfully or not. Bookkeeping also helps with managing cash flow and answering questions such as: who owes you money, who do you owe money to, when should you send an invoice, when are your bills due, etc.

Second, consistent bookkeeping will help minimize the headaches when it comes to preparing your annual taxes. If you can provide your accountant with a well maintained balance sheet, cash flow statement, and profit and loss statement he/she will be able to dedicate their time towards making sound tax decisions rather than fixing problems with the financial statements.

Third, sound books will help you with planning your business’ next steps. By understanding key benchmarks such as cost to acquire a new customer and cost of goods sold you can begin to make educated decision about the best way to grow your business.

Fourth, investors require solid books. The frequency of which you report financial records will be determined by you and your investors. In any case, the more automated and uniform your financial reporting systems are for reporting crucial financial information the happier your investors will be. It will show to them that you understand your cash flow needs and the business key performing indicators that will allow the business to scale.

Furthermore, when raising capital, sound records will instill confidence in your investor and significantly increase your likelihood of receiving a check.

Now that you are on-board with the important of bookkeeping for a startup, let’s look at 10 of the most common types of bookkeeping accounts for a startup or any business for that matter:

Cash:

This is your most basic account and it tells you exactly how much cash you have in your
bank. Many businesses will monitor their cash account by separating cash receipts and cash
disbursements.

Accounts Receivable:

Not all companies will have accounts receivables. Receivables represent
money that is due from customers and is therefore only applicable to companies that sell
products or services prior to collecting payment or a portion of the payment upon the time of
sale. Tracking receivables will help you understand cash flow and keeping a detailed list of your various receivable accounts will help you stay on top of billing and invoices.

Sales:

The sales account is closely tied to cash and accounts payable but provides slightly
different insight. Sales is where you track anticipated incoming revenues from what you sell.
Tracking sales accurately will help you understand whether your business is on track to meet
predetermined metrics and benchmarks.

Accounts Payable:

Similar to accounts receivable, accounts payable represent money that you
owe to your suppliers and vendors for products and services that you did not pay for entirely
upfront. Tracking your payables will help you with managing cash flow, ensuring that you don’t
pay your bills twice, and may even make you eligible for discounts if you are able to pay early.

Inventory:

While inventory is not equivalent to cash or accounts payable it is certainly an asset on your balance sheet that needs to be carefully accounted for and tracked. Properly managing your inventory will help with understanding cash flow and anticipated production runs.

Loans Payable:

You loans payable account tracks the amount of capital that you’ve borrowed, how much you still owe, and how much is due in the next billing cycle.

Purchases or Cost of Goods Sold:

This account helps you understand the cost of delivering your product and service and when subtracted from your Sales account you end up with gross profit.

Payroll:

Payroll is the biggest expense for most businesses and should be monitored closely. Maintaining an accurate payroll account will pay dividends when it comes to tax and
government reporting requirements not to mention understanding your personnel expenses.

Retained Earnings:

Retained earnings are simply profits that are not paid out to owners or shareholders. Retained earnings are cumulative, or a running total, and demonstrate the profits that are reinvested back into the business.

Owner’s Equity:

This account simply tracks the capital investment that the owners’ have put into the business. This account is particularly pertinent if there are multiple owners who have put in disparate amounts of capital.

If you have a question about your Startup business idea or you’d like to discuss our Book Keeping Management Services, feel free to contact us for a free consultation!

SEC Oks Equity Crowdfunding with Regulation A+ Changes to the JOBS Act

SEC Oks Equity Crowdfunding with Regulation A+ Changes to the JOBS Act

On March 25, 2015 the SEC amended Regulation A, commonly referred to as Reg. A+, to further implement Title IV of the JOBS Act.

The amended regulation seeks to create an environment where emerging enterprises can efficiently raise public capital through crowdfunding.

Historically, Reg A has not been widely used for two reasons:
1) the $5M offering size limit was perceived as too low

2) the blue ski registration and qualification requirements were too onerous.

To address these concerns, Reg A+ increases the offering size limit to $50M in a Tier 2 offering and up to $20M in a Tier 1 offering.

Additionally, certain Reg A+ companies will be able to avoid the SECs blue sky reporting regime.

Reg A+ are public offerings, similar to an IPO, however the regulatory obstacles are far lower thereby making this type of investment much more accessible to all investors, accredited or otherwise.

This is particularly welcoming to small and medium sized businesses that struggle to raise capital from high net worth investors or institutions. These small and medium businesses can now raise capital from a much larger pool of investors (commonly referred to as the crowd) which will increase capital formation thereby growing jobs and the economy as a whole.

There are still many nuances associated with Reg A+ but overall the SEC’s amendment is widely seen as a step in the right direction. Some of the differences between Tier 1 and Tier 2 regulations are outlined the chart below:
Equity Crowdfunding From The Startup Garage

If you have a question about your Startup business idea or you’d like to discuss our business plan writing services, feel free to contact us for a free consultation!

7 Lessons Learned From A Vegas Tech Startup Conference

Collision Con From The Startup Garage

7 Lessons Learned From A Vegas Tech Startup Conference

“ It’s A different kind of Vegas.”

Collision Conference invaded and innovated downtown Las Vegas, Nevada Cinco De May and 6th.

The 48 hour “crash course” included 7500 attendees representing 89 different countries, with a legendary guest-list that included: 200 WorldClass Speakers, 1000 Startup Businesses, 451 Tech Investors, and countless “smart” entrepreneurs.

Equally as interesting to the individuals that attended the conference, was where the event took place, “The Downtown Project” (Psst..If you haven’t heard this name get familiar with it, you’ll be hearing a lot about it.)

It’s there, just 6 miles from the infamous Las Vegas Strip, a small Startup town is brewing. The cutting edge urban revival project was heavily invested ($350million) in by Zappos frontman and startup cultural icon, Tony Hsieh.

His business model; to create a community of happiness, in an other wise depressed and dilapidated city centre… which leads us into lesson #1.

Lesson #1 Recognize potential and invest in it’s possibilities.

Startups Entrepreneurs are familiar with taking risks and getting comfortable in the uncomfortable. Tony Hsieh didn’t see the “Fremont Experience” and think let’s avoid this rundown area at all costs. Instead he said let’s immerse our company, culture and entrepreneurial energy into the infrastructure, and make old bones dance.

Lesson #2 Conferences, especially tech. conferences, need female minds in attendance.

Collision Conference acknowledged the fact that tech conferences tend to be sausage fests, and did something Different. They invited the top 150 females in technology to attend the conference complimentary, there by subtly shifting the dynamics of a male centric space.

Lesson #3 There’s an organic type of networking, it’s called Collision.

A Collision with another person, moves away from the hunt and gather mentality of standard networking events, and allows for the natural serendipity of individuals paths to cross.
Colliding with the right people at right place, and the right time, can become a natural and common occurrence.

Lesson #4 Never underestimate the power of food and lasting impressions.

Each morning upon entering the “event” attendees were treated to freshly baked blueberry muffins. The DoubleTree may have started this trend with freshly baked chocolate chip cookies, but the result remains the same… A feeling of being welcomed, comforted, and wanting to return for more.

Lesson #5 Collaboration is the easiest way to breed successful innovations.

In the chaotic sea of 1000+ Startup Businesses prepping and pitching to investors and want to be investors for funding and mentorship. I found myself wondering, how many of the Startup entrepreneurs conversed and collided with one another to exchange ideas and information? (please tweet us @startup_garage if you have a great Startup to Startup Collision story)

It seems that Collision Conference was the perfect landscape for new startup business ideas to emerge, and preexisting ones to flourish with new insights. However, my experience was everyone was there with laser focus in the hopes swooning the VC or Angel.

Lesson #6 You can’t talk Marketing without the other M word… Millennials.

#Millennials isn’t just a trending hashtag, they’re a population of 77 million people, 1/4 of the American population, who are socially and economically savvy. Millennials have big brands via-ing for their attention and approval. As a generation with an insatiable appetite for quality content and the Tinder mindset (swipe left and move onto the next) marketing power is shifting into the hands of the consumer.

Lesson #7 Innovation never sleeps.

Innovative ideas and solutions have no On and Off switch, they’re a constant switching in the mind of Startup entrepreneurs. It’s not enough that there’s a solution, the questions remains whether it’s the smartest and most effective solution possible.

There’s Startup towns brewing, do you hear it percolating?

A Tech Startup conference shifted my perception of Vegas from an epicenter of gambling, strippers, and intentional debauchery to a sustainable community of like-minded entrepreneurs, that when colliding together, have ability to transform even the most unsuspecting places.

The Correlation between A Startups Seed Round and Series A Round

The Correlation between Your Seed Round and Your Series A Round from The Startup Garage

The Correlation between A Startups Seed Round and Series A Round

Here at The Startup Garage we are often asked, “Has it become harder to raise capital for Startups nowadays?”

 

The answer is, yes and no.

On the one hand, the total dollars invested in U.S. startups in 2014 reached its highest point since the dot-com boom in 2000, according to Bloomberg. On the other hand, there are more startups competing for these dollars than ever before.

One of the hardest rounds to raise, and subsequently one of the biggest hurdles to startup success, is the Seed round. This round is potentially the riskiest round for an investor as most startups raising Seed capital have yet to accomplish any significant milestones that prove the concept.

The technology or product development is usually in its infancy,
The team is lacking,Traction is nominal if present at all, and The key benchmarks for success have yet to be proven. As a result, many good ideas never make it out of the gate.

Those that successfully navigate the Seed round significantly increase their chance at entrepreneurial success and at raising their next round of capital, the Series A round.

When raising a Seed round the question becomes, “How large of a seed round should I raise to maximize my chances of raising a Series A round?”

Smaller Seed rounds seem like a quick fix because they are simpler and faster to raise as they typically require less investors.

However, in order to raise a significant Series A round, the startup needs sufficient capital to accomplish enough milestones that will attract Series A investors. As a result, we see a direct correlation between the amount of capital raised in the Seed round and the amount of capital raised in the subsequent Series A round.

According to data from CB Insights, companies that raised both a Seed round and a Series A round can be categorized as follows:

  • Small – Below the 25th percentile (<$360K for Seed, <$2M for Series A)
  • Average – Between 25th and 75th percentile (between $260K and $1.5M for Seed, between $2M and $7M for Series A)
  • Large – Above 75th percentile (>$1,5M for Seed, >$7M for Series A)As depicted in the chart below, nearly half of all large Seed deals became large Series A deals. Most of the other large Seed deals went on to raise average Series A rounds with a small number raising a small Series A round.

For companies that raised small Seed rounds, 57% went on to raise an average Series A round, and only 13% raised Series A rounds of $7M+. Lastly, 63.8% of companies that raised an average Seed round went on to raise an average Series A round.

Moral of the story: if you plan on raising a Series A round, don’t cut yourself short during your Seed round.

Seed Funding From the Startup Garage

If you have a question about your Startup business idea or you’d like to discuss our business plan writing services, feel free to contact us for a free consultation!

Startup Business Funding Report 2014

Startup Business Funding Report 2014

The past year has been an eventful one for Startup Businesses in their quest to raise capital.

Venture Capitalists, Angel Investors, and Peer-to-Peer Crowdfunding soared in 2014, breathing new life into uncertain economy.

    Venture Capital Roundup

According to the PitchBook Platform 88 billion dollars in venture capital was infused into the global economy in 2014. Beating out any other single year ever, including the dot.com era.

Silicon Valley continues to reign supreme as the most competitive market to raise VC funding in, while hometown hero Uber took the largest 2 VC deals at 1.2 billion each.

On the east coast, the city that never sleeps, NYC is also thriving in the innovation economy, coming in 2nd in United States venture capital hubs. With the biggest VC backed deal going to coworking space, WeWork, with $355million dollars in funding.

It’s fair to say the venture capital ecosystem had an incredible run in 2014, transforming software startups into “unicorns” and providing hope and opportunity in the face of aversion. Whether or not all the risk will bring sustainable long-term rewards will become more evident in years to come.

    Angel Investment Roundup

2014 found Angel investors and groups becoming more prominent on and offline for early stage startups. At this time the Halo Reports Q4 report for 2014 is still being compiled, however we anticipate a steady increase in investments similar to previous quarters.

In Q2 alone 206 deals were funded totally $594million.
Pre-money valuation continued to rise jumping to $3 million in Q2, while Healthcare and Internet funding continues to be the most heavily funded industries.

Across the board opportunities to #GetFunded are abundant amongst individual Angels and Angel Groups globally. While with in the US, California, New England, and Texas have the most active investment networks.

    Crowdfunding Roundup

Crowdfunding is rapidly changing the landscape of Startup funding, and doesn’t appear to be slowing down. At the close of 2014, crowdfunding is estimated to add at least 270,000 jobs and inject more than $65 billion into the global economy, according to estimates from crowdfunding platform Fundable. 2014 turned platforms like Kickstarter and IndieGogo into household names. On Kickstarter alone 3.3 million people globally pledged more than ½ billion dollars last year, which is equivalent to $1,000 per minute. The funding brought to life 22,252 creative projects, exploding the alternative-funding platform.

Its clear Crowdfunding is disrupting how investors find opportunity and where entrepreneurs fuel their startup ideas. For the first time in history anyone can be an entrepreneur, investor, or both and the trend has yet to reach its tipping point.

    2015 & The Future of Capital Raising

2015 is sure to be a year of that will go down in history for innovative Startups and investment opportunities. The Startup Garage anticipates the following achievements in the next year: more women in the tech and the venture capital spotlight, emphasis on entrepreneurship and education with in academic institutions, and a rapidly expanding Startup Ecosystem.

If you have a question about your Startup Funding or you’d like to discuss our business plan writing services, feel free to contact us for a free consultation!

Angel Investments Soar in the U.S. Along with the Tech Coast Angels

Angel Investments Soar in Q1 along with Tech Coast Angels

Angel Investments Soar in the U.S. Along with the Tech Coast Angels

The Q1 2014 Halo Report was released recently by the Angel Resource Institute, Silicon Valley Bank and CB Insights

In a collaborative effort to raise awareness of early-stage investment activities by angel investors the Halo Report researches and analyzes angel investment activities and trends in North America.

This quarter’s report card will one most investors in the U.S. will be proud to share.

“Median angel round size increases to $980k, while pre-money valuations rise to $2.7 million in the quarter”

What’s this mean for Startups looking to raise capital?

It is one of the best times in history to get funded.
Especially, if your startup relates to the Internet, Healthcare, or Mobile, which make up 71.5 % of deals in the quarter.

“Opportunities are great for startups seeking funding today,” said Rob Wiltbank, Vice Chairman of Research, Angel Resource Institute.

Are you a California based Startup? Consider your ability to get funded that much more likely. California angels invested heavily locally accounting for 1/3 of all deals.

One investor network, Tech Coast Angels, seized the spotlight and proves that “your network, is your net worth.” Tech Coast Angels secured the “strongest network” spot on the Q1 Halo Report out of 370 angel groups, alluding to their greater ability to raise capital, as well as offer strategic expertise in a given area.

Perhaps this is due to their investor membership application process itself, which puts network and community 1st and money 2nd.

“You might think it’s to make money, but for many of us it’s a way to give back to the community, to help build successful companies and to participate in the satisfaction that comes from this involvement. And we hope to make money, too.”

Tech Coast Angels claims to be largest angel investor network in the Nation. Since 1997, and TCA has helped their portfolio companies attract more than $1.4 billion in additional funding. TCA is a catalyst in helping build Southern California’s economy into a thriving center of technology and entrepreneurship.

Feeling inspired and ready to #GetFunded?
Tech Coast Angels is hosting a quick pitch competition in San Diego Thursday Sept 25th, 2014.

Quick Pitch is a must attend event for entrepreneurs looking to jump-start their ventures and for investors seeking to learn about the latest innovations in Southern California. Be sure to say hello to The Startup Garage team at the event!

Whether you have a question about your pitch or you’d like to discuss our business plan writing services, feel free to contact us for a free consultation!